Transplantation

Transplantation is a procedure in which an organ, tissue, or cells from one area of the patient’s body is transferred to another part. Transplantation can also involve the transfer between two separate patients, a donor and a recipient. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is valuable modality in the treatment of various cancers. In the HSCT procedure, blood and bone marrow transplantation replaces ineffective immune cells with hematopoietic stem cells. Hematopoietic stem cells will then differentiate into the various types of blood cells and restore hematopoietic (blood formation) functions. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is also effective in the treatment of genetic diseases, where cells with defective genes are replaced by hematopoietic donor cells with normal gene expression. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is typically reserved for higher risk patients and may be used to treat the following conditions:

  • Multiple myeloma
  • Lymphomas
  • Hodgkin lymphoma
  • Leukemias
  • Neuroblastoma
  • Germ cell tumors
  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Amyloidosis
  • Myeloproliferative disorders
  • Myelodysplastic syndromes
  • Aplastic anemia
  • Pure red-cell aplasia
  • Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria
  • Fanconi anemia
  • Thalassemia major
  • Sickle cell anemia
  • Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)
  • Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome
  • Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis
  • Inborn errors of metabolism
  • Epidermolysis bullosa
  • Severe congenital neutropenia
  • Shwachman-Diamond syndrome
  • Diamond-Blackfan anemia
  • Leukocyte adhesion deficiency