Drilling Down on <em>FLT3</em>-Mutated AML
Webcast
Webcast

Drilling Down on FLT3-Mutated AML

FLT Like a Butterfly, Sting Like a Bee

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The information in this activity is intended for healthcare professionals based outside of the United States. You will be asked to provide your credentials before participating in the activity. This activity may contain information on products outside the approved indications where you practice.

Listen/watch world-renowned experts to learn the latest about the use of FMS‐like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) inhibitors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and ensure that you are at the forefront of this emerging area.

Overexpression of or mutations in the FLT3 define a unique subtype of AML with poor prognosis. The current standard of care for FLT3‐mutated AML remains limited to intensive induction chemotherapy, with the potential for post‐remission chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplant in appropriate patients. Recently, targeted therapies have been investigated in the first‐line setting as an addition to the induction regimen, with FLT3‐directed inhibitors being able to improve rates of complete remission and overall survival. Numerous first-generation and second-generation FLT3 inhibitors are being evaluated within the context of clinical trials across various disease settings.

As the targeted therapy options for FLT3‐mutated AML expand, it is essential for clinicians to keep up with new developments in understanding of disease biology, as well as the findings from clinical trials investigating first‐generation and second‐generation FLT3 inhibitors.

Interactive Presentation

Interactive Presentation

Downloadable Slides

Downloadable Slides

IME

IME

Release Date

Release Date

Nov 3, 2017

Expiration Date

Nov 3, 2018

Examining the scope of FLT-mutated AML
Martin Tallman, MD

First things first: Experience with 1st generation FLT3 inhibitors
Miguel Sanz, MD

Second wave of options: 2nd generation FLT3 inhibitors
Francesco Lo-Coco, MD

prIME Points™
Martin Tallman, MD

  • Martin Tallman, MDMemorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
    New York, New York, United States
  • Francesco Lo-Coco, MDUniversity Tor Vergata
    Rome, Italy
  • Miguel Sanz, MDValencia University Medical School
    University Hospital La Fe
    Valencia, Spain

This educational activity is specifically designed to meet the needs of hematologists and other healthcare professionals involved in the treatment of patients with AML.

The information in this activity is intended for healthcare professionals based outside of the United States. You will be asked to provide your credentials before participating in the activity. This activity may contain information on products outside the approved indications where you practice.

After successful completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

  • Identify the key diagnostic and prognostic features of FLT3‐mutated AML, and describe the rationale for actionable molecular targets in this disease subtype
  • Describe the differences in specificity of the FLT3 inhibitors and how this may identify when they are likely to be most beneficial (as initial therapy or in relapsed disease)
  • Assess recent clinical trial data for both first‐generation and second‐generation FLT3 inhibitors in FLT3‐mutated AML

This educational activity is supported by a grant from Novartis Oncology.

Independent Medical Education (IME)

This IME activity is organized by prIME Oncology. This activity provides content that is evidence-based, balanced, and free of commercial bias, with a primary objective to improve competence and performance of learners in order to improve patient care.

Provider

This enduring activity is provided by prIME Oncology.

Disclosure Information

Disclaimer

Participants have an implied responsibility to use the newly acquired information to enhance patient outcomes and their own professional development. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patients’ conditions and possible contraindications or dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities.

Disclosure Regarding Unlabeled Use

This activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration or European Medicines Agency. Please refer to the official prescribing information for each product discussed for discussions of approved indications, contraindications, and warnings.