Reviewing Key Data From the 2018 Annual Hematology Meeting - prIME Oncology
prIME Clinical Update
prIME Clinical Update

Reviewing Key Data From the 2018 Annual Hematology Meeting

Identifying the Practice-Changing Findings From the Big Meeting

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Get the critical updates in hematologic malignancies from the Annual Hematology Meeting in San Diego. This activity is an overview and critical assessment of key findings that have the potential to change practice.

Interactive Presentation

Interactive Presentation

CME

CME

1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™

CE

CE

1.5 Contact Hours

Release Date

Release Date

Mar 15, 2019

Expiration Date

Mar 15, 2020

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Featured Experts

  • Hagop M. Kantarjian, MD, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Richard M. Stone, MD, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

Featured Topics

Abstract 31: Nilotinib and Low Intensity Chemotherapy for First-Line Treatment of Elderly Patients with BCR-ABL1-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Final Results of a Prospective Multicenter Trial (EWALL-PH02)

Abstract 309: A Phase II Study of Dasatinib and Dexamethasone as Primary Therapy Followed by Transplantation for Adults with Newly Diagnosed Ph/BCR-ABL1-positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (Ph+ ALL): Final Results of Alliance/CALGB Study 10701

Abstract 36: Chemoimmunotherapy with Inotuzumab Ozogamicin Combined with mini-hyper-CVD, with or without Blinatumomab, for Newly Diagnosed Older Patients with Philadelphia Chromosome-Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Results from a Phase II Study

Abstract 33: Results of SWOG 1318: A Phase 2 Trial of Blinatumomab Followed by POMP (Prednisone, Vincristine, Methotrexate, 6-Mercaptopurine) Maintenance in Elderly Patients with Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Negative B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Abstract 895: Updated Analysis of the Efficacy and Safety of Tisagenlecleucel in Pediatric and Young Adult Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Abstract 896: Preliminary Data on Safety, Cellular Kinetics and Anti Leukemic Activity of UCART19,  an Allogeneic Anti-CD19 CAR T-cell Therapy in Adult and Pediatric Patients with CD19+ Relapsed/Refractory B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia  – A Pooled Analysis of the CALM and PALL Phase 1 Trials

Abstract 897: Updated Phase 1 Results of Zuma-3: Kte-C19, an Anti-CD19 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy, in Adult Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Acute Myeloid Lymphoma

Featured Experts

  • Ellen Ritchie, MD, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York City, New York, United States
  • Guillermo Garcia-Manero, MD, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, United States

Featured Topics

Abstract 285: Venetoclax in Combination with Hypomethylating Agents Induces Rapid, Deep, and Durable Responses in Patients with AML Ineligible for Intensive Therapy

Abstract 286: Interim Analysis of Phase II Study of Venetoclax with 10-day Decitabine (DEC10-VEN) in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Abstract 287: Enasidenib Is Highly Active in Previously Untreated IDH2 Mutant AML: Early Results from the Beat AML Master Trial

Abstract 560: Ivosidenib or Enasidenib Combined with Induction and Consolidation Chemotherapy in Patients with Newly Diagnosed AML with an IDH1 or IDH2 Mutation Is Safe, Effective, and Leads to MRD-Negative Complete Remissions

Abstract 563: Efficacy and Safety of Single-Agent Quizartinib (Q), a Potent and Selective FLT3 Inhibitor (FLT3i), in Patients (pts) with FLT3-Internal Tandem Duplication (FLT3-ITD)-Mutated Relapsed/Refractory (R/R) Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Enrolled in the Global, Phase 3, Randomized Controlled Quantum-R Trial

Abstract 2715: Phase I-II Study of Crenolanib Combined with Standard Salvage Chemotherapy and Crenolanib Combined with 5-Azacitidine in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients with FLT3 Activating Mutations

Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

Featured Expert

  • Sergio Giralt, MD, FACP, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, United States

Featured Topics

Abstract LBA2: Phase 3 Randomized Study of Daratumumab Plus Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone (D-Rd) Versus Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone (Rd) in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma (NDMM) Ineligible for Transplant (MAIA)

Abstract 151: Efficacy and Updated Safety Analysis of a Safety Run-in Cohort from Griffin, a Phase 2 Randomized Study of Daratumumab (Dara), Bortezomib (V), Lenalidomide (R), and Dexamethasone (D; Dara‐Vrd) Vs. Vrd in Patients (Pts) with Newly Diagnosed (ND) Multiple Myeloma (MM) Eligible for High‐Dose Therapy (HDT) and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation (ASCT)

Abstract 301: Maintenance Therapy with the Oral Proteasome Inhibitor (PI) Ixazomib Significantly Prolongs Progression-Free Survival (PFS) Following Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation (ASCT) in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma (NDMM): Phase 3 Tourmaline-MM3 Trial

Abstract 154: Phase II Trial of Combination of Elotuzumab, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone in High-Risk Smoldering Multiple Myeloma

Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Featured Expert

  • Kenneth Anderson, MD, Harvard Medical School and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

Featured Topics

Abstract 303: Phase 2 Study of Venetoclax Plus Carfilzomib and Dexamethasone in Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma

Abstract 488: Initial Results from a Phase 1 Clinical Study of bb21217, a Next-Generation Anti Bcma CAR T Therapy

Abstract 957: JCARH125, Anti-BCMA CAR T-cell Therapy for Relapsed/Refractory Multiple Myeloma: Initial Proof of Concept Results from a Phase 1/2 Multicenter Study (EVOLVE)

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Featured Expert

  • Anthony Mato, MD, MSCE, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, United States

Featured Topics

Abstract LBA-4: A Randomized Phase III Study of Ibrutinib (PCI-32765)-Based Therapy Vs. Standard Fludarabine, Cyclophosphamide, and Rituximab (FCR) Chemoimmunotherapy in Untreated Younger Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL): A Trial of the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group (E1912)

Abstract 691: Ibrutinib + Obinutuzumab Versus Chlorambucil + Obinutuzumab as First-Line Treatment in Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (CLL/SLL): Results from Phase 3 iLLUMINATE

Abstract 692: Acalabrutinib in Treatment-Naive (TN) Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL): Updated Results from the Phase 1/2 ACE-CL-001 Study

Abstract 184: MURANO Trial Establishes Feasibility of Time-Limited Venetoclax-Rituximab (VenR) Combination Therapy in Relapsed/Refractory (R/R) Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Abstract 297: Phase I/II Study of Umbralisib (TGR-1202) in Combination with Ublituximab (TG-1101) and Pembrolizumab in Patients with Relapsed/Refractory CLL and Richter’s Transformation

Abstract 298: Prospective Clinical Trial of Anti-CD19 CAR T Cells in Combination with Ibrutinib for the Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Shows a High Response Rate

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Featured Expert

  • Ariela Noy, MD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, United States

Featured Topics

Abstract 396: Minimal Residual Disease Response at End of Induction and during Maintenance Correlates with Updated Outcome in the Phase III GALLIUM Study of Obinutuzumab- or Rituximab-Based Immunochemotherapy in Previously Untreated Follicular Lymphoma Patients

Abstract 445: AUGMENT: Phase III Study of Rituximab/ Lenalidomide vs Rituximab/Placebo for R/R Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Abstract 781: FLYER: Phase III Trial of R-CHOP x 4 Followed by Rituximab x 2 vs Standard R-CHOP x 6 in Younger Patients With Favorable-Prognosis DLBCL

Abstract 782: Venetoclax Plus Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin, Vincristine, and Prednisolone Improves Outcomes in BCL-2-Positive First-Line Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: First Safety, Efficacy, and Biomarker Analyses From the Phase II CAVALLI Study

Abstract 784: A Global, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Study of Ibrutinib Plus Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicin, Vincristine, and Prednisone (RCHOP) in Patients with Previously Untreated Non-Germinal Center B-Cell-Like (GCB) Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL)

Abstract 228: Phase II KEYNOTE-170/KEYNOTE-013 Update: Pembrolizumab in Relapsed/Refractory Primary Mediastinal Large B-Cell Lymphoma

Abstract 1684: Sustained Disease Control for Adult Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: An Updated Analysis of Juliet, a Global Pivotal Phase II Trial of Tisagenlecleucel

Abstract 2967: 2-Year Follow-up and High-Risk Subset Analysis of Zuma-1, the Pivotal Study of Axicabtagene Ciloleucel (Axi-Cel) in Patients with Refractory Large B-Cell Lymphoma

CD30+ Lymphoma

Featured Experts

  • Owen A. O’Connor, MD, Columbia University Medical Center, New York City, New York, United States
  • Barbara Pro, MD, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States

Featured Topics

Abstract #997: The ECHELON-2 Trial: Results of a Randomized, Double-Blind, Active-Controlled Phase 3 Study of Brentuximab Vedotin and CHP (A+CHP) Versus CHOP in the Frontline Treatment of Patients with CD30+ Peripheral T-Cell Lymphomas

Abstract #681: Clinical Responses to CAR.CD30-T Cells in Patients with CD30+ Lymphomas Relapsed after Multiple Treatments Including Brentuximab Vedotin

Abstract #927: Response-Adapted Therapy with Nivolumab and Brentuximab Vedotin (BV), Followed By BV and Bendamustine for Suboptimal Response, in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults with Standard-Risk Relapsed/Refractory Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

Abstract #682: Tislelizumab (BGB-A317) for Relapsed/Refractory Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma: Preliminary Efficacy and Safety Results from a Phase 2 Study

 

  • Kenneth Anderson, MDHarvard Medical School and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Guillermo Garcia-Manero, MDThe University of Texas
    MD Anderson Cancer Center
    Houston, Texas, United States
  • Sergio Giralt, MD, FACPMemorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
    New York, New York, United States
  • Hagop M. Kantarjian, MDThe University of Texas
    MD Anderson Cancer Center
    Houston, Texas, United States
  • Anthony Mato, MD, MSCEMemorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
    New York, New York, United States
  • Ariela Noy, MDMemorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
    New York, New York, United States
  • Owen A. O’Connor, MDColumbia University Medical Center
    New York City, New York, United States
  • Barbara Pro, MDRobert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University
    Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Ellen Ritchie, MDWeill Cornell Medicine
    New York City, New York, United States
  • Richard M. Stone, MDDana-Farber Cancer Institute
    Boston, Massachusetts, United States

This educational activity is designed to meet the needs of practicing hematologists, oncologists, oncology nurses, researchers, and other health care professionals involved and/or interested in the management of patients with hematologic malignancies and the consequences of these diseases.

After successful completion of this educational activity, participants should be able to:

  • Identify important clinical findings presented at the 2018 ASH Annual Meeting
  • Discuss how new findings in the management of hematologic malignancies could be incorporated into routine practice

This educational activity is supported by a grant from AbbVie Inc.; AstraZeneca; Celgene Corporation; and Seattle Genetics, Inc.

Continuing Education

In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by the Postgraduate Institute for Medicine and prIME Oncology.   Postgraduate Institute for Medicine is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

The Postgraduate Institute for Medicine designates this  enduring material for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

The maximum number of hours awarded for this Continuing Nursing Education activity is 1.5 contact hours.

 

Provider

This activity is jointly provided by Postgraduate Institute for Medicine and prIME Oncology.

Disclosure Information

Method of Participation

There are no fees for participating in and receiving CME credit for this activity. In order to receive credit, participants must successfully complete the online activity evaluation. Your participation in this CME activity will be recorded in prIME Oncology’s database and in your My prIME account. You can download your certificate as needed. Technical requirements may be found under the Terms of Use.

Estimated time to complete activity: 1 hour, 30 minutes

To contact Postgraduate Institute for Medicine please visit www.pimed.com.

Disclosure of Relevant Financial Relationships

Postgraduate Institute for Medicine (PIM) and prIME Oncology require instructors, planners, managers, and other individuals who are in a position to control the content of this activity to disclose any real or apparent conflict of interest (COI) they may have as related to the content of this activity. All identified COI are thoroughly vetted and resolved according to PIM policy. PIM is committed to providing its learners with high quality activities and related materials that promote improvements or quality in healthcare and not a specific proprietary business interest of a commercial interest.

The faculty reported the following financial relationships or relationships to products or devices they or their spouses/life partners have with commercial interest related to the content of this activity:

Dr Anderson has disclosed that he has received consulting fees for Advisory Boards from Bristol-Myers Squibb, Celgene, Gilead, Janssen, and Millennium/Takeda. He also disclosed ownership interest (less than 5%) in C4 Therapeutics and OncoPep. He has agreed to disclose any unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products referenced in his presentation.

Dr Garcia-Manero has disclosed that he has received grants or research support from AbbVie, Amphivena, Astex, Celgene, H3 Bio, Helsinn, Merck, Novartis, and Onconova. He also discloses paid consulting for Amphivena, Astex, and Celgene. He has agreed to disclose any unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products referenced in his presentation.

Dr Giralt has disclosed that he has received grants or research support from Actinuum, Amgen, Celgene, Johnson & Johnson, Miltenyi, Sanofi, and Takeda. He also discloses that he has received honoraria from Actinuum, Amgen, Celgene, Johnson & Johnson, Kite, Novartis, Sanofi, and Takeda. He has agreed to disclose any unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products referenced in his presentation.

Dr Kantarjian has disclosed that he has received grants or research support from Amgen, Ariad, Astex, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Novartis, and Pfizer. He has also received honoraria from AbbVie, Actinium, Amgen, ARIAD, Bristol-Myers Squibb, ImmunoGen, Orsinex, and Pfizer. He has agreed to disclose any unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products referenced in his presentation.

Dr Mato has disclosed that he has received grants or research support from AbbVie, Loxo, Pharmacyclics, Regeneron, Sunesis, and TG Therapeutics. He also discloses honoraria from AstraZeneca, Celgene, Johnson & Johnson, Pharmacyclics, Sunesis, and TG Therapeutics. He has agreed to disclose any unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products referenced in his presentation.

Dr Noy has disclosed that she has received consulting fees from Janssen. She has also received honoraria from Pharmacyclics. She has received grant/research support from Pharmacyclics and Raphael. She has agreed to disclose any unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products referenced in her presentation.

Dr O’Conner has disclosed that he has received consulting fees from Seattle Genetics. His institution has also performed contracted research for Seattle Genetics. He has agreed to disclose any unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products referenced in his presentation.

Dr Pro discloses grants or research support from and paid consulting for Seattle Genetics and Takeda. She also discloses grants or research support from Celgene. She has agreed to disclose any unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products referenced in her presentation.

Dr Ritchie has disclosed that she has received consulting fees from Agios and Tolero. She has also performed contracted research for Jazz Pharmaceuticals. She has received fees for non-CME/CE services from Incyte and Pfizer. She has agreed to disclose any unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products referenced in her presentation.

Dr Stone discloses that he has received consulting fees from AbbVie, Agios, Amgen, Arog, Astellas, AstraZeneca, Celgene, Cornerstone, Fujifilm, Jazz, Macrogenics, Novartis, Orsenix, Otsuka/Astex, Pfizer, and Sumitomo. He also discloses receipt of research funding from Agios, Arog, and Novartis. He discloses scientific advisory board participation for Actinium. He has served on a steering committee for Celgene and on the data safety monitoring boards for Argenx, Celgene, and Takeda. He has agreed to disclose any unlabeled/unapproved uses of drugs or products referenced in his presentation.

Postgraduate Institute for Medicine planners and managers have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

The employees of prIME Oncology have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Disclosure Regarding Unlabeled Use

This activity may contain discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the US Food and Drug Administration or European Medicines Agency. Please refer to the official prescribing information for each product discussed for discussions of approved indications, contraindications, and warnings.

Disclaimer

Participants have an implied responsibility to use the newly acquired information to enhance patient outcomes and their own professional development. The information presented in this activity is not meant to serve as a guideline for patient management. Any procedures, medications, or other courses of diagnosis or treatment discussed or suggested in this activity should not be used by clinicians without evaluation of their patients’ conditions and possible contraindications or dangers in use, review of any applicable manufacturer’s product information, and comparison with recommendations of other authorities.